Phlox pan. Shockwave - Tall Garden Phlox
Helenium Salud Embers - Sneezeweed
Asclepias incarnata Cinderella - Swamp Milkweed
Stachys Hummelo - 2019 Perennial of the Year
Echinops Blue Glow - Globe Thistle
Gaillardia Arizona Apricot - Blanket Flower

Feed them; they will come.

 

Butterflies seek out nectar among flowers and host plants to lay their eggs on.

 

Be sure to include a host plant (like Asclepias, Aster, dill, parsley, Rudbeckia) near two nectar plants and you'll see more butterflies.

Aster Woods Pink - Michaelmas Daisy
Echinacea Green Jewel - Coneflower
Agastache Blue Boa - Anise Hyssop
Lewisia Constant Coral - Cliff Maids
Liatris spicata - Blazing Star
Rudbeckia Goldsturm - Black-Eyed Susan
Sedum sieboldii - Stonecrop
Veronica Aspire - Speedwell
Anaphalis m. Pearly Everlasting
Monarda Grand Mum - Bee Balm
Antennaria Pussytoes
Stokesia Honeysong Purple - Stokes Aster

Monarch Kit

We pack 6 of the best Monarch plants together with a garden plan to get you started. Two Asclepias hosts, plus four nectar plants. $50

OUR TOP 18

 

recipe for more monarchs

The most important equation for butterfly gardens is 2 + 1 = More. Plant 2 nectar plants with 1 host plant and you'll see more butterflies.

recipe for more monarchs

Helping Monarchs is Easy

These three specific plants can help make a big difference in Monarch populations.

Salvia varieties supply ample nectar on the return from the migration. After all, it's a long trip from Mexico to the Midwest.

Allium varieties provide nectar and also ward off aphids on host plants.

Asclepias varieties are host for the next generation to hatch and grow.

recipe for more monarchs

Asclepias For the Monarch Nursery

Monarchs in particular have seen a dramatic decline because of the scarcity of Asclepias (the milkweed family). You don't have to plant the invasive varieties to help Monarchs. All the Asclepias we sell are hardy, non-invasive and perfect nurseries for Monarch caterpillars.

1 host, 2 nectar